Panasonic

InfluenceMap Score
C-
Performance Band
58%
Organisation Score
55%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Information Technology
Head​quarters:
Osaka, Japan
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Panasonic has limited direct engagement with specific climate policy both in Japan and globally, although it appears to support climate action by Japan in its top-line messaging. Panasonic is a member of and holds executive positions in multiple industry associations that have appeared to lobby negatively on Paris-aligned climate policies, including the Japanese Business Federation (Keidanren), but also holds memberships in a few associations that have consistently lobbied positively on climate change.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Panasonic has expressed broad support for climate change response in its top-line messaging, and there is some evidence of support for the need for climate change regulation. Panasonic CEO Yuki Kusumi has appeared to recognize the necessity of responding to climate change, stating in the company’s 2021 Annual Report in September 2021 that “we already face the impact of climate change with increased greenhouse gases, including CO2, in many areas of the globe” and that “the situation is critical.” Panasonic has expressed support for achieving the goals of the Paris Agreement in its 2021 Sustainability Data Book, and in a January 2021 press release recognized that “the creation of a decarbonized society is essential to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.” In February 2020, Panasonic was a signatory of a statement submitted to the Japanese government by the Japan Climate Initiative (JCI) committing to decarbonization efforts in Japan with “greater determination than ever before.”

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Evidence has shown limited but positive engagement by Panasonic with climate-related regulations regarding renewable energy and GHG emissions. In March 2021, Panasonic was a signatory of a statement by the Japan Climate Leaders’ Partnership and RE100 requesting that the Japanese government raise its 2030 renewable energy target from 22-25% to 50% in the Strategic Energy Plan, in addition to policies to increase renewable energy such as strengthening the energy grid and enabling offsite corporate power purchase agreements. In February 2020, Panasonic urged the Japanese government to strengthen its national targets, including GHG emissions reduction targets, in a joint statement initiated by JCI.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Panasonic has directly engaged with policymakers in support for hydrogen, although without specifying on the need to decarbonize hydrogen production. In the METI Hydrogen/Fuel Cell Strategy Council, Panasonic expressed support for low emissions technology such as hydrogen power generation turbines, hydrogen reduction steelmaking, and stationary fuel cells in December 2020, and in February 2021 made recommendations including expansion of hydrogen, collaboration on fuel cells between industry, government, and academia, and the inclusion of hydrogen fuel cells as the mainstay of the Green Growth Strategy. Panasonic has expressed support for green and zero-emissions hydrogen to decarbonize society in its corporate media as well as some support for renewables, stating on its Youtube channel in January 2022 that to achieve carbon neutrality, countries must “further accelerate the generation of renewable electricity” to “power the grid and produce green hydrogen.” In a corporate press release in October 2021, Panasonic recognized that “it is indispensable to introduce renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, geothermal, hydro, and biomass power” to achieve carbon neutrality, but appeared to argue for an expanded role for hydrogen due to issues such as output variations from weather conditions for solar and wind.

Panasonic appears to support the electrification of the transportation and industrial sectors, stating it was “essential to further electrify” such sectors “where fossil fuel is still heavily used as a thermal and power source” on its website, accessed in January 2022.

Industry Association Governance: Panasonic has disclosed its membership in the Japan Business Federation (Keidanren), which has lobbied against certain Paris-aligned climate policy, on its website. It has disclosed that its company president is the vice chairperson of the deliberation committee of Keidanren in its 2021 CDP Climate Change Information Request, along with limited details of its indirect policy engagement through Keidanren and that its position on climate change is consistent with that of Keidanren. However, Panasonic has not disclosed its additional memberships, including the Central Japan Economic Federation (CJEF), which has appeared to have lobbied negatively on numerous climate-related policies, and the Japan Electronics and Information Technology Industries Association (JEITA), which has had limited mixed engagement with climate and energy policies, and of which the chairman of the board of Panasonic is the vice president. In addition, the vice president of Panasonic is the vice chair of the Kansai Economic Federation (KEF), which has lobbied against policies such as carbon taxes and emissions trading, and the senior managing executive officer of Panasonic is a director of Japan Electrical Manufacturers' Association (JEMA), which has had some negative engagement with climate change policies. Furthermore, Panasonic is a member of the Alliance for Automotive Innovation, which has had mixed and mostly negative engagement on climate policy in the US in recent years, and the European Association of Automotive Suppliers (CLEPA), which has consistently lobbied against higher CO2 standards for vehicles. On the other hand, Panasonic is a member of the Japan Climate Initiative (JCI) and the Zero Emission Transportation Association (ZETA) and an associate member of the Japan Climate Leaders Partnership (JCLP), which have lobbied positively on some climate change and energy policies in Japan, ZETA in the US.

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Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
48%
 
48%
 
54%
 
54%
 
47%
 
47%
 
54%
 
54%
 
55%
 
55%
 
90%
 
90%
 
44%
 
44%
 
52%
 
52%
 
46%
 
46%
 
72%
 
72%
 
88%
 
88%
 
55%
 
55%
 
57%
 
57%
 
48%
 
48%
 
42%
 
42%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.