Nissan

InfluenceMap Score
D+
Performance Band
52%
Organisation Score
48%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Automobiles
Head​quarters:
Yokohama, Japan
Brands and Associated Companies:
Infiniti, NISMO, Datsun
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Nissan seems to take mixed positions on a number of climate policy strands globally in 2020-22. The company has mixed engagement on policies promoting the electrification of transport, and also appears to have opposed more stringent GHG standards for vehicles in the US. In addition, Nissan retains memberships to a number of obstructive trade associations in Japan and globally.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: In a 2021 press release, Nissan appeared to support efforts to keep global temperature rise below 1.5°C, and in its 2020 Sustainability Report, it acknowledges the risk of climate regulation without stating a clear position on the issue. A January 2021 press release from Nissan also appeared to support the goals of the Paris Agreement.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: In the United States, Nissan appears to have supported weaker federal GHG and CAFE standards for vehicles. Most recently in a September 2021 US consultation response, Nissan appeared to directly oppose higher-range GHG emission and CAFE standards, instead supporting mid-range standards and calling for flexibilities, including off-cycle credits, to weaken the policy. In June 2019, Nissan was part of a group of automakers that wrote to President Donald Trump to advocate against the freezing of federal CAFE standards, but instead advocated for standards that were weaker than those set under the Obama Administration. In October 2019, the company intervened as part of a coalition of automakers in a legal case to support the removal of California's ability to set its own stricter GHG emissions standards under the state’s Clean Air Act waiver, later withdrawing from this litigation in early 2021.

Positioning on Energy Transition: In its 2020 Sustainability Report, Nissan stated its support for the decarbonization of transport, emphasizing the role of hydrogen within this transition. In its 2021 CDP response, the company detailed how it has engaged with EU policymakers to support policies promoting the electrification of transport, including EV purchase incentives and the expansion of EV charging infrastructure. However, a September 2021 CNBC media report noted that Nissan appeared to oppose higher EV tax credits for unionized automakers in the US, instead calling for EV tax credits to be extended to all automakers. In a December 2021 interview with Automotive News, Nissan CEO, Makoto Uchida, appeared to take a mixed position on the electrification of transportation, supporting different pathways for different regions and indicating an unclear position on hybrids and pure BEVs. Similarly, a March 2022, a senior Nissan executive appeared to suggest support for a long-term role for ICE-powered hybrid vehicles over BEVs depending on the European region, in an interview with Automotive News Europe.

Industry Association Governance: Nissan does not appear to provide a disclosure of its trade association memberships on its website or through its 2021 CDP disclosure. The company has not completed an audit of its trade association memberships. Nissan is a member of a number of obstructive trade associations including the Japanese Automobile Manufacturers Association, where Nissan executive Uchida Makoto is an executive director, Japan Business Federation (Keidanren), Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers (SIAM) and US-based Alliance for Automotive Innovation. A Nissan senior executive is also on the Steering Committee of the Automobile Business Association of Japan (ABAJ).

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Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
43%
 
43%
 
33%
 
33%
 
37%
 
37%
 
55%
 
55%
 
48%
 
48%
 
73%
 
73%
 
54%
 
54%
 
72%
 
72%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.