Repsol

InfluenceMap Score
D+
Performance Band
52%
Organisation Score
52%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Energy
Head​quarters:
Madrid, Spain
Brands and Associated Companies:
Petronor
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Repsol appears to show mixed support for specific climate policy to respond to climate change. While the company has advocated for switching from coal to fossil gas in the energy mix, it appears to view fossil gas as a long-term energy source rather than as a transition fuel.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Repsol appears broadly supportive of climate policy in its top-line messaging. In Repsol’s 2021 Global Sustainability Plan, it stated that it supported limiting global temperature increase to well below 2ºC. In its 2021 Industry Association Review, it has stated support for the Paris Agreement. In a November 2021 consultation response, Repsol appeared to support the EU Green Deal target of reaching climate neutrality by 2050 as well as the increased 2030 GHG target of 55% by 2030. In Repsol’s 2021 Industry Association, it stated that it supported global pricing policies.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Repsol appears to have shown mixed support for specific policies to reduce emissions. In a November 2021 consultation response on the EU’s Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM), it appeared to support the policy while continuing to advocate for the free allowances and the continuation of existing carbon leakage protection measures under the EU Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS) until 2030 or later.In a separate consultation from the same month, Repsol stated that the CBAM should not replace free allocation in the EU ETS. In the same consultation response, Repsol also appeared to oppose a cross-sectoral correction factor being applied to the EU ETS and the reduction of free allowances, adding that the ‘unrealistic’ tightening of EU ETS benchmarks could weaken carbon leakage protection. Repsol also submitted a consultation on the review of the EU’s Energy Efficiency Directive (EED) in November 2021, in which it did not support the exclusion of fossil gas counting towards energy saving obligations and did not appear to support any binding targets. Further, in a November 2021 consultation response, Repsol supported the Renewable Energy Directive (RED) with major exceptions, advocating for a technology-neutral approach and for recycled carbon fuels to be allowed for compliance.

On transport, in March 2021, a Freedom of Information request appeared to show Repsol supporting minimum blending mandates for sustainable aviation fuels through the ReFuelEU policy. On transport greenhouse gas emissions standards, Repsol advocated for the inclusion of "renewable and net-zero-carbon" fuels for compliance which could weaken stringency of the policy, while in a separate consultation in February 2021, Repsol appeared to advocate for a later 2040 EU phase out date for ICE vehicles, advocating that ICE vehicles using low/zero GHG emissions fuels should be considered zero emission vehicles.

However, in August 2020, Repsol appeared to support the direct regulation of methane emissions as part of the EU methane strategy, and appeared to support similar regulation in other regions that it operates in, such as Alberta.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Repsol appears to be supporting the continued role for fossil fuels in the energy mix. In February 2021, Repsol chairman Antonio Brufau Niubo stated in a report that oil and fossil gas will remain a useful and necessary energy source in a decarbonized world, and advocated that these technologies be able to compete freely with other energy sources, specifically opposing any bans.

Repsol submitted a consultation response on the EU’s Sustainable Finance Taxonomy in December 2020, where it advocated for free competition and technology neutrality while also advocating for low carbon hydrogen to be included. In a separate consultation on the EU’s revision of performance standards in November 2021, Repsol appeared to promote the continued role for internal combustion engine vehicles and ‘low carbon fuels’, while supporting a technology-neutral approach to decarbonizing transport.

Industry Association Governance: In 2021, Repsol updated its industry association review. In the review, it has listed its membership to industry associations it holds a membership with, including details of the type of membership held, but with limited details of how the company influences or attempts to influence their climate change policy positions. Nevertheless, the company identified one case of partial misalignment with the American Petroleum Institute (API), as it did in its 2020 review. However, it continues to hold a membership with API despite evidence of consistently negative positions on climate policy and the energy mix. Repsol also retains memberships to other industry associations that traditionally lobby negatively on climate-related policysuch as the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers, BusinessEurope and FuelsEurope.

A detailed assessment of the company's industry association review can be found on our CA100+ platform here.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
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Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
47%
 
47%
 
57%
 
57%
 
36%
 
36%
 
52%
 
52%
 
68%
 
68%
 
42%
 
42%
 
60%
 
60%
 
47%
 
47%
 
42%
 
42%
 
86%
 
86%
 
56%
 
56%
 
41%
 
41%
 
68%
 
68%
 
49%
 
49%
 
24%
 
24%
 
67%
 
67%
 
41%
 
41%
 
58%
 
58%
 
48%
 
48%
 
57%
 
57%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.