Honda Motor

InfluenceMap Score
D+
Performance Band
55%
Organisation Score
47%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Automobiles
Head​quarters:
Tokyo, Japan
Brands and Associated Companies:
Accord, Honda Aircraft Company, Civic, CR-V
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Honda is engaging with climate regulations in the USA, Japan, and the UK with mixed to negative positions in 2020-21. While the company has supported some policies to facilitate the decarbonization of road transportation, Honda has also strongly opposed legislation that explicitly favors battery electric vehicles (BEVs) over hybrid vehicles, although recent evidence from 2021 suggests an evolving position. The company is a member of numerous obstructive trade associations.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Honda has generally positive top-line messaging on climate policy. The company appears to support GHG emissions reductions in line with the 1.5°C target, as stated in its 2021 Sustainability Report. It also recognized the transport sector's role in responding to climate change in a September 2021 US consultation response. In an August 2021 joint statement on the Biden Administration’s Steps to Strengthen American Leadership on Clean Cars and Trucks, the company expressed support for the goals of the Paris Agreement, and in an April 2021 media report, Honda’s CEO, Toshihiro Mibe, appeared to support Japan becoming carbon neutral in 2050, referring to the goal as a “feasible target”. A September 2021 Honda consultation response also stated support for the UK's 2050 net-zero target yet did not appear to support some near-term actions to implement such targets, emphasizing economic concerns.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Honda has consistently engaged with US policymakers on regulations to decarbonize road transport. In its September 2021 US consultation response on revised 2023 and Later Model Year Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Standards, Honda appeared to support the EPA's mid-range GHG emission standards in the US, while directly opposing higher-range standards. Honda formed part of a group of companies that wrote a letter to President Donald Trump in June 2019, advocating against freezing federal CAFE standards, and instead supported proposed standards weaker than those set under the Obama Administration. In July 2019 Honda entered into a voluntary compromise arrangement with California regulators that accepts the state's tailpipe standards and zero-emission vehicle mandates. In April 2021, Honda’s CEO, Toshihiro Mibe, appeared to endorse Japan’s raised 2030 46% economy-wide GHG emissions reduction target as “feasible”, while emphasizing that it would be “extremely difficult”.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Honda appears to generally support a low carbon transition for road transport, stating its general support for policy to facilitate the decarbonization of transport fuels. However, the company appears opposed to regulation that directly incentivizes BEVs over hybrid vehicles, including opposing a zero-emissions vehicles mandate in California in 2020 and the United Kingdom in a 2021 consultation response. In March 2021 testimony to Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), Honda also stated opposition to introducing a ZEV mandate in Japan.

A 2020 UK consultation response from Honda also seemed to oppose the UK’s plan to phase out ICE and hybrid vehicles by 2035, referring to it as “too narrow”. Additionally, an April 2021 UK consultation response from Honda Motor Europe stated support for a later 2035 phase-out date for hybrids in the UK, and emphasized the need for "technology neutral" policies to promote hybrid vehicles over battery electric vehicles alone. ”. A September 2021 UK consultation response similarly appeared to advocate for the UK government to include sales for “a full range” of hybrids, including non-PHEVs, from 2030-35 in its ICE phase-out policy. In the same 2021 UK consultation responses Honda appeared supportive of policies and incentives to promote EVs, including a plug-in grant, alongside policies to promote the use of e-fuels over prioritizing EVs.

However, while former Honda CEO, Takahiro Hachigo, said in March 2020 that the company would prioritize hybrids over EVs, communications from Honda US in June 2021 suggest an evolving position for the wider electrification of transportation. In July 2021, Honda’s current CEO, Toshihiro Mibe, suggested that its electrification plan could be accelerated in response to the proposed EU 2035 ICE vehicle ban, stating that the company must comply with the growing international trend. Furthermore, in August 2021, media comments from Honda in Newsweek appeared supportive of policies promoting the electrification of US transportation. However, an op-ed in CNN Business from a Honda America executive in November 2021 stated opposition to a proposed EV tax credit for union-made electric vehicles in the US Build Back Better Act, while appearing to support a general EV tax credit. At the Japanese ministerial committee on 2030 mobility held by METI in December 2020, Honda also appeared to be generally supportive of electrification of transportation.

Industry Association Governance: Honda does not have a dedicated, centralized disclosure of its membership of and engagement with industry associations. The company is a member of several obstructive trade associations, including the US-based Alliance for Automotive Innovation, Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers (SIAM), the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) and the Japan Business Federation (Keidanren). Honda Chairman and Director, Toshiaki Mikoshiba, is a vice chairman of Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association (JAMA), Honda’s North America’s Executive Vice President Rick Schostek is on the board of the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) and President of Honda Europe, Katsuhisa Okuda, is on the board of European Automobile Manufacturers Association (ACEA). The company has not completed an audit of a potential misalignment with its trade associations on climate policy.

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Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
43%
 
43%
 
48%
 
48%
 
28%
 
28%
 
50%
 
50%
 
40%
 
40%
 
36%
 
36%
 
54%
 
54%
 
72%
 
72%
 
67%
 
67%
 
54%
 
54%
 
54%
 
54%
 
57%
 
57%
 
47%
 
47%
 
48%
 
48%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.