HeidelbergMaterials (previously HeidelbergCement)

InfluenceMap Score
D+
Performance Band
57%
Organisation Score
52%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Construction Materials
Head​quarters:
Heidelberg, Germany
Official Web Site:

Climate Lobbying Overview: HeidelbergMaterials (previously HeidelbergCement) seems to strategically engage with climate change with supportive positions, although with several exceptions. The company appears to have become less oppositional to climate policy over time, increasing support for top-line climate ambition and the energy transition between 2020-22. However, it continues to advocate to weaken the ambition of several key climate regulations in the EU, such as the EU Emissions Trading System.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: HeidelbergMaterials broadly supports climate action in its top-line messaging on climate policy. The company has consistently supported limiting global warming to 1.5°C, for example, in its 2021 Annual Report, published in March 2022. In a review of its industry association membership published in December 2021, HeidelbergMaterials seemed to support government policy to respond to climate change, but has consistently stressed preference for a global framework and global level playing field conditions. In a meeting with EU Commissioner Breton in March 2021, sourced from a Freedom of Information Request, the company advocated for the need for a combination of ‘push’ and ‘pull’ measures, such as incentives and standardization, in the Fit for 55 package and close coordination with the Industrial Policy at EU and national levels. In its 2021 CDP Climate Change Disclosure, the organization supported the UN Paris Agreement.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: HeidelbergMaterials appears to engage on climate change regulation with mixed positions. On its corporate website, accessed in January 2022, the company supported the EU Commission’s proposed reforms to the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS), but also advocated for the continuation of the free allocation of emissions allowances to protect against carbon leakage, a position which is misaligned with the EU Commission. In its 2021 CDP Disclosure, HeidelbergMaterials suggested that changes to existing carbon leakage protection should only happen gradually. In a July 2021 earnings call, the Chairman Dominik von Achten suggested that the free allocation of emissions allowances in the EU ETS could begin to be phased out once the EU’s Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM) became fully effective, a position which is misaligned with the EU Commission’s proposal.

In HeidelbergMaterials' 2021 CDP Disclosure, it supported policies to scale up renewable energy production. On its corporate website, accessed in January 2022, HeidelbergCement advocated for product standards and procurement schemes for low-emission building materials.

Positioning on Energy Transition: HeidelbergMaterials broadly supports the energy transition. In its industry association review in December 2021, the company supported increased renewable energy in the energy mix. However, it also advocated for hydrogen produced with any fuel in the short-term with green hydrogen production as a long-term goal in the review. HeidelbergMaterials was supportive of alternative fuels to replace fossil fuels in the cement production process, including non-recyclable waste and biomass, on its corporate website, accessed in January 2022. The CEO Dominik von Achten supported the US Infrastructure Bill to invest in climate-friendly infrastructure in a March 2021 earnings call.

Industry Association Governance: HeidelbergMaterials published a detailed review of its alignment with industry associations in December 2021, but did not disclose all of the memberships it retains, such as the Confederación Española de Organizaciones Empresariales (CEOE). The company retains positions on the boards of several industry associations which are lobbying negatively on climate policy, including CEMBUREAU, the Federation of German Industries (BDI) and the Confederación Española de Organizaciones Empresariales (CEOE).

InfluenceMap collects and assesses evidence of corporate climate policy engagement on a weekly basis, depending on the availability of information from each specific data source (for more information see our methodology). While this analysis flows through to the company’s scores each week, the summary above is updated periodically. This summary was last updated in Q3 2022.

A detailed assessment of the company's industry association review can be found on our CA100+ webpage here.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
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Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
54%
 
54%
 
56%
 
56%
 
46%
 
46%
 
36%
 
36%
 
48%
 
48%
 
48%
 
48%
 
56%
 
56%
 
68%
 
68%
 
46%
 
46%
 
52%
 
52%
 
74%
 
74%
 
55%
 
55%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.