Engie

InfluenceMap Score
C+
Performance Band
70%
Organisation Score
65%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Utilities
Head​quarters:
Paris, France
Brands and Associated Companies:
GDF SUEZ, International Power , Tractebel Energia, Electrabel
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Engie is actively engaged with several climate policy streams in Europe. The company has taken increasingly positive positions on EU climate ambition and appears focused on advocating for the role of 'renewable' and 'low-carbon' gases, alongside its consistent support for unabated fossil gas in the future energy mix.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Engie appears to be supportive of increased climate ambition in its top-line communications. Despite initially not supporting a ‘net-zero’ GHG target in a consultation with EU policymakers in 2018 (supporting an 80-95% range target instead), Engie has since advocated support for ‘climate-neutral ’or ‘net-zero’ targets. For example, the company supported net-zero by 2050 goals in the EU and US in its 2021 Integrated Report, published in May 2021. The company also appears to be supportive of the need for climate change regulation, advocating for robust carbon pricing policies in its December 2021 Industry Associations review, and calling for the UK government to support regulation to respond to climate change in a 2020 Corporate Leaders Group joint letter to UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Engie stated support for the Paris Agreement as part of a French Business Climate Pledge in April 2021.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Engie has advocated for carbon pricing as a favored mechanism for reducing GHG emissions. The company appears to be supportive of the EU’s Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism, along with a minimum price floor for the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) as stated in an October 2020 consultation response. However, it did not specify a position on removing existing carbon leakage protection for exposed sectors under the EU ETS. In its February 2021 consultation response on the EU ETS, Engie expressed hesitancy to expand the scheme to more sectors and increase ambition due to the risk of carbon leakage. Engie appears to be supportive of the EU’s 2030 55% GHG emission reduction target, stating support in its 2021 Integrated Report, and in a consultation response to EU ETS Updates in February 2021.

In its February 2021 consultation response on the EU’s Renewable Energy Directive (RED), Engie appeared to support an increase in ambition for renewable energy targets, while advocating for the inclusion of targets for renewable gas. Additionally, the company signed a joint letter to EU policymakers in December 2021, advocating for the Delegated Act on RED to support flexible approaches, weaker hydrogen production criteria and did not appear to support the additionality principle. In July 2021, Engie signed a joint letter to EU policymakers advocating support for an EU aviation e-kerosene mandate of 0.5%-1% for 2027 and up to 2.5% for 2030, as part of the ReFuelEU Aviation initiative to promote the use of sustainable aviation fuels in the EU's Fit for 55 climate package.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Engie’s engagement appears to be mixed on the energy transition, with positions that continue to promote the role of unabated fossil gas in the energy mix, along with the development of hydrogen and biomethane. In its December 2021 Industry Associations Climate Review, the company stated it recognizes unabated fossil gas as “a key enabler” of the energy transition, with CEO Catherine MacGregor sharing a similar position in LeFigaro in October 2021. Additionally, Engie supported a weakening of the EU’s Sustainable Finance Taxonomy in its December 2020 consultation response, by advocating for a higher threshold for electricity generation to enable the inclusion of fossil gas plants. Engie has directly engaged with policymakers in Europe in a June 2020 consultation response advocating for policies to promote ‘green’ and low-carbon hydrogen, as well as other ‘renewable gases’, but also stressing the “essential role” of fossil gas in the medium term. In its 2021 Climate Report, Engie seemed to support the role for fossil gas in the energy mix, but advocated for it to be progressively greened with biogas.

Industry Association Governance: In its December 2021 Industry Association Review, Engie disclosed its membership to industry associations, and included broad details on engagement activities and misalignment without reference to specific policies, activities or climate positions. Despite its mostly positive policy advocacy, Engie retains membership of numerous industry associations, including BusinessEurope and Edison Electric. It also has executives in senior positions at MEDEF, co-president of the Ecological and Economic Transition committee, and Eurogas, trade association president, that are actively and negatively engaged on climate regulation in Europe.

A detailed assessment of the company's industry association review can be found on our CA100+ platform here.

Additional Note: The government of France owns 23.64% of Engie. It is likely that Engie retains channels of direct and private engagement with French officials that InfluenceMap is unable to assess. As this is not publicly available information, it is not reflected in Engie's engagement intensity metric.

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Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
60%
 
60%
 
48%
 
48%
 
86%
 
86%
 
42%
 
42%
 
65%
 
65%
 
62%
 
62%
 
72%
 
72%
 
86%
 
86%
 
77%
 
77%
 
56%
 
56%
 
75%
 
75%
 
65%
 
65%
 
76%
 
76%
 
57%
 
57%
 
58%
 
58%
 
68%
 
68%
 
54%
 
54%
 
58%
 
58%
 
68%
 
68%
 
85%
 
85%
 
57%
 
57%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.