EDF

InfluenceMap Score
B
Performance Band
82%
Organisation Score
74%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Utilities
Head​quarters:
Paris, France
Brands and Associated Companies:
EDF Energy, EDF Ostalbkreis, Unistar Nuclear Energy, Edison S.p.A
Official Web Site:

Climate Lobbying Overview: EDF appears to take predominantly positive positions on climate change policy, with strategic engagement on a range of key policy streams, including notably strong support for the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS).

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: EDF appears supportive of climate action in its top-line communications. The company supported limiting temperature rise to 1.5°C on its corporate website, accessed in February 2021. In its 2020 EU Affairs Report, published in 2021, EDF stated support for the EU’s 2050 climate neutral objective and the UN Paris Agreement. In feedback on the 2030 Climate Target Plan EU public consultation in May 2020, EDF advocated that policies at European and national level should become aligned with the 2050 climate neutrality target. In its 2021 CDP disclosure, the company stated support for government policy intervention for carbon pricing.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: EDF has engaged positively with climate regulations in the EU. The company appeared to strongly support the ambitious reforms made to the EU ETS under the EU’s Fit for 55 legislative climate package. In a November 2021 EU public consultation response, it supported reforms such as increasing the Linear Reduction Factor and strengthening the Market Stability Reserve, along with creating new ETS schemes for the buildings and road transport sectors. In a 2021 joint letter to EU policymakers, EDF stated support for the EU’s Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism, advocating for the inclusion of the hydrogen sector, but did not specify a position on removal of existing carbon leakage protection for exposed sectors under the EU ETS. Outside of Europe, EDF has also supported emissions trading policies, such as supporting the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative in Virginia in a January 2022 letter to the Virginia General Assembly.

In a November 2021 EU public consultation response, EDF supported a revision to increase the ambition of the EU Energy Efficiency Directive, but advocated against a higher annual energy savings obligation. In a July 2021 joint CEO letter, EDF stated support for the EU’s Renovation Wave energy efficiency initiative, advocating for greater efficiency improvements in buildings and an expansion of heat pumps. The company also advocated for stronger energy efficiency standards in the US, and supported the Virginia Clean Cars vehicle fuel economy standards in a January 2022 letter to the Virginia General Assembly.

The company supported increasing the EU’s 2030 renewable energy target to at least 40%, in the EU’s Renewable Energy Directive (RED) revision. In a November 2021 EU public consultation response the companyadvocated for non-renewable, low-carbon hydrogen to be recognized in the directive The company has consistently supported increasing the EU’s emission reduction target to 55%, including in its 2020 EU Affairs Report, published in 2021, and supported emissions standards to reduce emissions in the transportation sector.

Positioning on Energy Transition: EDF strongly supports the transition of the energy mix. In a November 2021 EU public consultation response, the company supported the revision of the EU Energy Taxation Directive, including advocating for it to switch to an energy content taxation structure, to prevent the promotion of fossil gas, and support low-carbon hydrogen with taxation benefits. In a January 2022 social media post, EDF supported the revision of the EU TEN-E regulation, including advocating for measures to promote hydropower and offshore wind development, while also calling for the inclusion of low-carbon hydrogen. CEO Jean-Bernard Levy stated in a December 2021 post on LinkedIn that the EU Hydrogen and Gas Decarbonization Package should provide equal treatment for blue, green and pink hydrogen. In its 2020 EU Affairs Report, published in 2021, the company supported the EU’s Hydrogen Strategy and Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Directive, including support for renewable electrification of the economy and low-carbon hydrogen.

EDF appeared to support France’s RE 2020 energy efficiency legislation for buildings, which aims to phase out fossil gas an energy source for buildings, and advocated for decarbonization of housing, according to La Tribune in January 2021. In an April 2021 joint letter, EDF called for the decarbonization of energy systems in the EU and the US, and supported the deployment of zero-emissions vehicles.

Industry Association Governance: EDF, in its 2020 EU Affairs Report and Trade Association and Lobbying Process Review, disclosed a list of European trade associations of which it is a member, with some details on engagement and alignment on positions, but with limited details of membership outside of EU. Despite its membership of associations which have supported EU climate policy, such as WindEurope and SolarPower Europe, EDF is also a member of Eurogas, and is an indirect member of MEDEF, which appear unsupportive of various strands of climate and energy policy. EDF stated in its 2021 EU Affairs report that it is no longer a member of [112 BusinessEurope, due to the group’s position on climate policy.

Additional Note: EDF is a listed company with more than 50% of its shares owned by the government of France. State-owned enterprises likely retain channels of direct and private engagement with government officials that InfluenceMap is unable to assess, and therefore are not represented in EDF's engagement intensity metric.

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Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
84%
 
84%
 
75%
 
75%
 
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80%
 
86%
 
86%
 
72%
 
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60%
 
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93%
 
93%
 
58%
 
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85%
 
56%
 
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58%
 
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48%
 
48%
 
48%
 
48%
 
86%
 
86%
 
68%
 
68%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.