thyssenkrupp

InfluenceMap Score
D+
Performance Band
54%
Organisation Score
52%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Metals & Mining
Head​quarters:
Buisburg and Essen, Germany
Brands and Associated Companies:
Rothe Erde, Berco
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: thyssenkrupp appears to be actively engaged on climate change policy, with mixed positions. The company seems to take mostly positive stances on climate policy in its top-line messaging, but remains negatively engaged on key climate policy streams such as the EU Emissions Trading System. thyssenkrupp holds influential positions in the Federation of German Industries (BDI) and Eurofer, which are lobbying negatively on climate change policy

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: thyssenkrupp seems to take mixed positions on climate policy in its top-line messaging. On its corporate website, accessed in January 2022, thyssenkrupp supported efforts to limit global temperature increase to 1.5°C. However, in its 2021 CDP Climate Change Disclosure, the company stated it supports the German Climate Law with major exceptions, suggesting it needs “adequate measures” and should avoid collisions with the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS). In its 2020/21 Annual Report, published in January 2022, thyssenkrupp supported the need for government regulation to respond to climate change, advocating for a mix of instruments and clear political will. However, on social media in November 2021, the company seemed to suggest that regulation must include measures to prevent carbon leakage and preserve international competitiveness. On its corporate website, accessed in February 2021, thyssenkrupp stated support for the UN Paris Agreement and the finalization of the Article 6 rulebook.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: thyssenkrupp’s engagement with specific climate regulations appears to be predominantly negative. In response to an EU public consultation on the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) in November 2021, the company did not support any of the EU Commission’s proposed reforms to the EU ETS to align the policy with the EU’s increased 2030 climate target, and advocated for strengthened carbon leakage protection measures. In a February 2021 consultation response on the EU ETS, thyssenkrupp supported a reform of the Linear Reduction Factor to decrease the emissions cap. In response to an EU public consultation on the proposed Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM) in November 2021, the company advocated for exemptions for the steel industry from the policy, as well as no phase out of free allowances in the EU ETS before 2030 and the inclusion of export rebates, a position which is misaligned with the EU Commission’s proposal. Handelsblatt reported in May 2021 that thyssenkrupp did not support the increase in ambition of Germany’s GHG targets. In response to an EU public consultation in April 2020, the company did not seem to support increasing the GHG emissions target, stressing that the carbon leakage risk must be eliminated before tightening targets.

However, thyssenkrupp stated support for increased investment in renewable energy production on its corporate website, accessed in January 2022. The company signed a joint letter in April 2021 advocating for more ambitious light-duty fuel economy standards in the US.

Positioning on Energy Transition: thyssenkrupp appears to mostly support the energy transition. The CEO Martina Merz stated support for the decarbonization of industry and for policies to scale up renewable energies in Germany in November 2021, and advocated for the creation of a decarbonized hydrogen economy in September 2021. On its corporate website in a statement before COP26, accessed in January 2022, the company supported the phase out of coal and the electrification of mobility. The company has also been supportive of replacing fossil fuels in transportation with biofuels and e-fuels produced with green hydrogen, and using alternative fuels to decarbonize the cement industry on its corporate website, accessed in January 2022. In its 2021 CDP Climate Disclosure, thyssenkrupp supported green hydrogen legislation, but also advocated for creating hydrogen using natural gas and CCS in a January 2021 press release. However, in its 2020/21 Annual Report, thyssenkrupp supported the energy transition provided that policies preserve the competitiveness of industry.

Industry Association Governance: thyssenkrupp discloses a list of some of its memberships to industry associations, but does not describe the climate policy positions of the associations nor how the company is influencing the groups. The company holds several influential positions on committees in the Federation of German Industries (BDI), which takes a negative stance on climate policy, and the Chairman of the supervisory board of thyssenkrupp is President of the association. A senior executive is a Vice President of Eurofer, which is negatively engaging on climate policy in the EU. The company does not appear to have published a review of alignment with industry associations.

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DATA SOURCES
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Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
46%
 
46%
 
50%
 
50%
 
62%
 
62%
 
42%
 
42%
 
41%
 
41%
 
62%
 
62%
 
68%
 
68%
 
44%
 
44%
 
68%
 
68%
 
54%
 
54%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.