Mitsubishi Corporation

InfluenceMap Score
D+
Performance Band
59%
Organisation Score
48%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Industrials
Head​quarters:
Tokyo, Japan
Brands and Associated Companies:
Diamond Energy, MCX, Mitsubishi Shoji
Official Web Site:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Mitsubishi Corporation appears to have limited engagement on climate and energy policy. It communicates broadly positive top-line positions on climate change. However, at a more detailed level, it appears to have mixed positions on several policy issues. It has stated support for energy efficiency and renewable energy regulations. But evidence suggests that the company also lobbied for weaker fuel economy standards in the US and a continued role for gas in the global energy mix. In addition, Mitsubishi Corporation retains membership to a number of industry associations that have lobbied against climate policies.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: As of January 2021, Mitsubishi Corporation has acknowledged the science of climate change, and stated support for the Paris Agreement and efforts towards increased greenhouse gas emissions reduction in line with the 2°C target in the company’s statement on climate change and sustainability. The company has also stated support for government regulation to respond to climate change in 2019, and actively advocated the UK government to align the COVID-19 economic recovery plan to its 2050 net zero emissions target in 2020. However, in 2020, the CEO of Mitsubishi emphasized the social responsibility of stable energy supply in addition to environmental considerations and proposed finding flexible solutions to climate problems.

Engagement with Climate-related Regulations: Mitsubishi Corporation appears to have limited and mixed engagement with climate-related regulations. In 2019, Mitsubishi Corporation advocated the US government to adopt Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards weaker than those originally agreed under the Obama Administration. In 2020, the company disclosed in its response to the CDP Climate Change questionnaire that it has directly advocated policymakers for legislation to support renewable energy and energy efficiency. However, when speaking about energy efficiency, it has focused on the development of low-carbon technologies with no mentions of specific policies or economy-wide targets.

Positioning on Energy Transition: In 2020, Mitsubishi Corporation has expressed support for the decarbonization of the economy. However, it appears to also support a continued role for natural gas in the energy mix without placing clear conditions on the deployment of CCS or methane abatement measures. For example, in its Integrated Report (2019), the company stated that demand for natural gas, “which has a low impact on the environment,” is increasing. This vision is restated by the Corporation’s President and CEO Takehiko Kakiuchi, who asserted in November 2019 that the role of LNG and natural gas is becoming increasingly important as a substitute for coal and oil as well as a complementary source of energy to renewables.

Industry Association Governance: Mitsubishi Corporation has not disclosed a full list of industry association memberships in its corporate reporting, nor has it published a review of its alignment with industry associations on climate policy. In its 2020 CDP submission, Mitsubishi Corporation disclosed membership to three industry associations along with the associations' climate position and the company’s role in influencing their policy position. Mitsubishi Corporation remains a member of a number of industry associations engaged in negative climate policy lobbying, including American Petroleum Institute, Australian Petroleum Production & Exploration Association, Keidanren, and Queensland Resources Council.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
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Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
70%
 
70%
 
33%
 
33%
 
55%
 
55%
 
48%
 
48%
 
30%
 
30%
 
47%
 
47%
 
34%
 
34%
 
39%
 
39%
 
54%
 
54%
 
76%
 
76%
 
67%
 
67%
 
52%
 
52%
 
26%
 
26%
 
44%
 
44%
 
43%
 
43%
 
54%
 
54%
 
44%
 
44%
 
87%
 
87%
 
29%
 
29%
 
41%
 
41%
 
51%
 
51%
 
45%
 
45%
 
53%
 
53%
 
49%
 
49%
 
69%
 
69%
 
34%
 
34%
 
55%
 
55%
 
24%
 
24%
 
40%
 
40%
 
38%
 
38%
 
47%
 
47%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.