Incitec Pivot

InfluenceMap Score
D-
Performance Band
41%
Organisation Score
43%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Chemicals
Head​quarters:
Southbank, Australia
Brands and Associated Companies:
Southern Cross International, Dyno Nobel, Incitec Pivot Fertilizers
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Incitec Pivot appears to take a negative positions in its approach to climate change policy in Australia, with limited engagement since 2018 with key policies. However, the company appears to support legislation which would increase the role of fossil gas in the energy mix in Australia.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Incitec Pivot appears to have mixed support for climate change policy in its top-line messaging. The company appeared to broadly support the need for GHG emissions reductions in a position paper published in November 2020, but it is unclear whether the company supports reductions in line with IPCC guidance. Nonetheless, the company’s 2019 Climate Change Policy stated support for the UN Paris Agreement. Incitec Pivot appeared to support a carbon pricing scheme in Australia in a 2020 position paper. However, in its 2019 Climate Change Policy, the company suggested that domestic climate policy must reduce the impacts of carbon leakage, essentially advocating that climate policies aim to protect the competitiveness of companies and incentivize production domestically to stop companies from relocating operations.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Incitec Pivot appears to have limited transparent engagement with climate change regulations in recent years. In a position paper published in November 2020, the company acknowledged that it is subject to the Australian Safeguard Mechanism, but did not appear to take a position on the policy. The company does not appear to have disclosed on climate change policy engagement via CDP since 2017.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Incitec Pivot appears to take a negative position on the energy transition. At the 8th annual Australian Domestic Gas Outlook in March 2021, the company appeared to advocate for policy measures in Australia to increase the role of unabated fossil gas in the energy mix. A 2020 article in The Australian Business Review suggested the company’s CEO, Jeanne Johns, supported measures to lock-in fossil gas infrastructure and development. Along with this, the Sydney Morning Herald reported in January 2021 that Incitec Pivot had advocated for cheaper gas prices.

Industry Association Governance: Incitec Pivot does not appear to disclose a list of memberships to industry associations. However, the company retains membership of several Australian industry associations engaging negatively on climate change policy, including Queensland Resources Council. Several senior executives hold influential positions in associations which are actively lobbying against climate legislation in Australia climate policy, such as the Energy Users' Association of Australia and the Minerals Council of Australia. Incitec Pivot does not appear to have published a review of its alignment with industry associations as of February 2022.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
1NSNANSNSNSNS
0NSNSNSNS0NS
1NSNSNS00NS
1NSNANS-11NS
0NA-2NANANANS
NSNSNSNS-1-1NS
NSNS-1NSNSNSNS
NSNS-1NSNSNSNS
NSNS1NSNSNSNS
1NS1NS-1-1NS
0NS-1NSNS-1NS
-1NS-2NANANANS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
38%
 
38%
 
41%
 
41%
 
50%
 
50%
 
76%
 
76%
 
31%
 
31%
 
48%
 
48%
 
53%
 
53%
 
27%
 
27%
 
13%
 
13%
 
33%
 
33%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.