Eni

InfluenceMap Score
C-
Performance Band
58%
Organisation Score
54%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Energy
Head​quarters:
Rome, Italy
Brands and Associated Companies:
AGI, Eni Gas & Power, Polimeri Europa, Saipem
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Eni is actively lobbying EU climate policy with mixed positions, including the EU Emissions Trading System and the Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism. Eni also appears to support a long-term role for gas in the energy mix, and retains memberships to industry associations actively promoting fossil fuels.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Eni’s top-line messaging on climate policy appears to be broadly positive. In a report titled ‘a just energy transition’, published in May 2021, the company supported carbon neutrality in the energy sector by 2050 to keep temperature increase below 1.5 °C by the end of the century. On its corporate website in 2022, Eni also stated support for the Glasgow Climate Pact and the most ambitious goals of the Paris Agreement. In a 2020 consultation response, Eni stated that it supported the ongoing commitment of the EU Commission to support a more ambitious GHG reduction target by 2050. Eni does not appear to explicitly state support for the need for government regulation to tackle climate change.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Eni is actively engaged with the EU on its climate related policies, with mixed engagement. In a 2020 consultation response on the EU’s Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM), Eni stated that it supported the policy while it also appeared to advocate for the inclusion of export rebates and for the ‘energy raw materials’ to be exempt, to reduce the impacts on competitiveness. This position was reaffirmed in a 2021 consultation response, where it again stated support for the CBAM while also advocating for free allocation for some exports. However, in a separate consultation response in 2021, Eni appeared to not support the increased EU 2030 GHG target of at least 55%, emphasizing risk of carbon leakage and impacts on competitiveness for energy intensive industries.

Eni’s engagement on the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) also appears to be mixed. In its 2021 CDP response, Eni stated that it supports the EU ETS as a central pillar of European climate policy, however, its consultation responses on the policy appear to place caveats on this support. In 2021, the company appeared to oppose the expansion of the ETS to the building and transport sectors, citing short term market disruptions to the ETS. However, in a separate consultation response in 2020, Eni stated support for expanding the EU ETS into road and maritime transport and buildings sectors with the exception that this is a gradual phase-in. However, by supporting the extension of the EU ETS to road transportation, the company did not appear to support vehicle CO2 standards in a November 2020 consultation response, which the EU ETS would most likely replace. Similarly, in another consultation in 2020, Eni stated that any expansion of the ETS to further sectors should replace ‘other sector specific measures’, while advocating for free allowances to remain.

Eni’s lobbying on other forms of climate regulation also appears to be mixed. In a February 2021 consultation response on CO2 performance standards, Eni appeared unsupportive of more ambitious CO2 performance standards for light-duty vehicles, stating that all technologies should compete on a level playing field. However, Eni appeared to support proposed methane regulations in the EU, but again placed conditions on this support, such as gradual implementation and appeared to warn against ‘unintended consequences’ if a more ambitious framework was adopted. Eni also stated that it supported an increase in the EU’s renewable energy target to reflect the 2030 climate target plan in a 2021 consultation response on the Renewable Energy Directive. It also voiced its support for minimum blending mandates for renewable fuels in the aviation sector in a March 2021 consultation response.

Positioning on Energy Transition: While Eni appears ton support the need to decarbonize the energy mix in its top-line messaging, it also appears to promote the long-term role for fossil gas. In its 2020 Annual Report, published in 2021, it stated that gas will be important to support intermittent sources in the energy transition, while on its corporate website in 2022 it stated support for the phase out of unabated coal generation and “inefficient” fossil fuel subsidies. In Eni’s consultation response on the EU’s gas market reforms in June 2021, the company appeared to support a continued role for fossil gas with CCS and advocated for a technology-neutral approach for a future hydrogen market. In a June 2020 EU consultation response from Eni on the EU’s Hydrogen Strategy, it appeared to emphasize economic and technical issues by shifting towards green hydrogen and appeared to instead support hydrogen produced using fossil fuels. In 2021, Eni also appeared to oppose the proposed 100 grCO2eq/kWh threshold for electricity generation/cogeneration in the EU taxonomy and appeared to advocate for this to be raised, which may result in electricity generated using fossil fuels to be included, while also stating that new investments in fossil gas power generation should not be limited.

In a 2020 consultation response on the EU’s Energy Taxation Directive, Eni stated that sectors covered by the EU ETS should be exempt and that energy intensive industries should continue to receive a special tax treatment and appeared to promote a ‘technological neutral’ approach to the policy while promoting the benefits of Combined Heat and Power (CHP), adding that all products and technologies should be leveraged. Eni also appeared unsupportive of the electrification of road transport in its consultation on CO2 performance standards in 2021, while prioritizing the role for internal combustion engined vehicles.

Industry Association Governance: In 2020, Eni published a review of its industry association memberships and their climate-related positioning and engagement. Within this review, Eni stated it is “fully aligned” with 25 of its industry associations regarding their climate-related engagement and “not aligned” with one, the American Fuel & Petroleum Manufacturers (AFPM). Eni stated that it would not renew its membership for AFPM in 2020. . Eni does not appear to have updated its industry review as of February 2022. Eni retains membership to various industry associations in Europe lobbying negatively on climate change policy while promoting the long-term role for oil and gas in the energy mix, including the International Association of Oil & Gas Producers, FuelsEurope,BusinessEurope and The Australian Petroleum Production & Exploration Association (APPEA). A senior executive of Eni is also on the board of SolarPower Europe, which is positively lobbying EU climate policy.

A detailed assessment of the company's corporate review on climate policy engagement can be found on InfluenceMap's CA100+ Investor Hub here.

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How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.