Dow Chemical

InfluenceMap Score
D
Performance Band
53%
Organisation Score
43%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Chemicals
Head​quarters:
Midland, United States
Brands and Associated Companies:
Dow AgroSciences, Union Carbide, Rohm and Haas, ANGUS Chemical Company
Official Web Site:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Dow Chemical (Dow) appears to have mixed positions on climate change policy, with high engagement. Dow’s top-line positions have become more positive over the past few years, although the company retains memberships to industry associations which lobby negatively on climate change policy and holds powerful positions within several of these groups.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Dow has broadly positive top-line messaging on climate policy. Dow appears to support emissions reductions consistent with IPCC demands, stating support for limiting temperature increase to 1.5°C or well below 2°C in its 2020 ESG Report, released in June 2021. In May 2021, Dow participated in a Ceres coalition calling for a US infrastructure package that included climate provisions. The company’s corporate website, as of March 2022, states support for carbon emissions pricing with major exceptions, a position reiterated in a December 2021 blog post. The company contributed funds to the Alliance for Market Solutions, which lobbied US Congress in favor of carbon pricing as reported by Politico in May 2021. In January 2021, Dow CEO Jim Fitterling advocated for “durable policies and investments” and a carbon pricing policy in the US to respond to climate change. In the same article from January 2021, Fitterling supported the US rejoining the UN Paris Agreement, and in December 2020 was a member of the “America is All In” campaign, which advocated for the US to rejoin the Paris Agreement.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Dow has mixed engagement with climate regulations and legislation. In a Q4 2021 Lobbying Disclosure, Dow reported that it had engaged on lobbying on the Build Back Better Plan along with the Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill, but did not disclose its position on either. Dow CEO Jim Fitterling penned an October 2021 opinion piece in the Hill in support of a US emissions trading program. In January 2021, Fitterling advocated for an emissions trading system in the US as an effective policy to reduce carbon emissions on Dow’s corporate blog. In a February 2021 joint email to EU Vice President Timmermans, sourced via a freedom of information (FOI) request, Dow opposed a national carbon tax in the Netherlands, strongly advocating that action should be taken at the European level instead of national level. In March 2021, Dow also supported Texas Senate Bill 1278, which would impose costs on renewable energy generation. However in that same month, Dow served as a supportive witness for Texas SB398, which would facilitate solar energy generation.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Dow has mixed engagement on the energy transition. Dow CEO Jim Fitterling in January 2021 stated support for the transition to a net-zero economy and advocated for policies to decarbonize the energy sector, but did not appear to take a clear position on high-carbon sources in the energy mix, stating that “manufacturers require constant, very high temperatures to make products, which today can only be provided by coal, gas, hydrogen or nuclear energy,” but following this with the statement “we will need all forms of clean energy to transform across all sectors.” However, Dow did tweet in April 2021 a statement supporting an increase in natural gas infrastructure without clarifying conditions related to methane abatement and carbon capture. In March 2021, a representative of Dow served as a witness for Texas House Bill 17, which would prevent local authorities from limiting any type of energy in the construction of buildings or infrastructure. These bills are increasingly common in US states, and appear to be a reactionary measure to municipal bans on fossil gas infrastructure. In the same month, the company supported Texas Senate Bill 1202, which would make the owning and operation of EV charging stations easier in the state. Dow in 2020 tweeted support for an industry shift to low-carbon hydrogen production and in a corporate blog in 2020 advocated for increased renewable energy in the energy mix.

Industry Association Governance: Dow is a member of several industry associations which take negative positions on climate change policy, including the American Petroleum Institute and the Business Council of Australia. The company is on the board of several associations negatively lobbying on climate policy, such as American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers, and the CEO of Dow is Chair of the National Association of Manufacturers. The company is also a member of the US Chamber of Commerce, where a Dow executive sits on the board of directors. Dow discloses a partial list of its memberships on its corporate website accessed in March 2022, but does not disclose their climate policy positions nor how it influences these groups. The company has not published a formal review of its alignment with industry associations as of March 2022.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
22NSNS21NS
12NSNSNS1NS
-11NSNS10NS
11NSNS22NS
-1NA-1NANANANS
NS-1NS-2NSNSNS
-101NS-12NS
111-22NSNS
-11002-1NS
11-1010-2
-120NS01NS
0NS-1NANANANS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
62%
 
62%
 
29%
 
29%
 
28%
 
28%
 
57%
 
57%
 
21%
 
21%
 
46%
 
46%
 
24%
 
24%
 
60%
 
60%
 
52%
 
52%
 
72%
 
72%
 
53%
 
53%
 
48%
 
48%
 
47%
 
47%
 
67%
 
67%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.