Cemex

InfluenceMap Score
C+
Performance Band
73%
Organisation Score
58%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Construction Materials
Head​quarters:
Monterrey,, Mexico
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate‌ ‌Lobbying‌ ‌Overview:‌ ‌‌CEMEX appears to be strategically engaging on climate change policy in the EU and US. The company is supportive in its top-line messaging on high-level climate ambition and the energy transition, and its engagement on key climate policies has become more positive since 2021. However, CEMEX still takes more mixed positions on some market-based policies in the EU, such as the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS).

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: CEMEX appears to be supportive of climate action in its top-line communications. The CEO Fernando González signed a joint letter in May 2022 to EU Commission President Ursula von der Leyen advocating for limiting global warming to 1.5°C and supporting the EU’s goal of net-zero emissions by 2050. The CEO also appeared supportive of the US’s increased climate ambition in an April 2021 earnings call. CEMEX supports ambitious government policy to respond to climate change. The company and its CEO signed joint letters in June 2021 and May 2022 strongly supporting the EU’s Fit for 55 package to align the region’s climate legislation with its increased 2030 GHG target. CEMEX supported the UN Paris Agreement on its US corporate website, accessed in November 2021, and on social media in the same month it stated support for COP26.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: CEMEX takes mostly supportive positions when engaging on climate change regulations. The company signed a joint letter in June 2021 to EU policymakers supporting GHG legislation, including the increased 2030 GHG target of 55%, the 2035 zero-emission standard for light duty vehicles, CO2 standards for climate neutral products and the Effort Sharing Regulation. It also supported the UK Future Homes Standard to reduce emissions from new homes on its corporate website, accessed in June 2022.

CEMEX stated support for emissions trading systems, such as the EU ETS, in its 2021 Integrated Report, published in March 2022. Its CEO also signed a joint letter in May 2022 strongly supporting a more ambitious reform of the EU ETS. However, on its corporate website accessed in November 2021, the company did not seem to support reforms such as strengthening the Market Stability Reserve and reducing the free allocation of emissions allowances. In its 2021 CDP disclosure, CEMEX also supported the free allocation of allowances in California’s emissions trading scheme, and advocated for a carbon border adjustment mechanism to complement the free allowances. The company signed a joint letter in June 2021 supporting the EU’s Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism (CBAM) without specifying a position on the phase out of free emissions allowances in the EU ETS. The news outlet Echodonia reported in May 2022 that CEMEX supported a gradual reduction of the free allocation of emissions allowances alongside a CBAM.

CEMEX supported energy efficiency legislation for buildings based on a life cycle analysis on its website, accessed November 2021. Its CEO signed an open letter in May 2022 strongly supporting more ambitious reforms of the Energy Efficiency Directive and buildings legislation the Renovation Wave and Energy Performance of Buildings Directive, and also supported a more ambitious reform of the Renewable Energy Directive. However, on its corporate website accessed in November 2021, the company suggested that energy intensive companies should receive compensation for renewable energy levies.

Positioning on Energy Transition: CEMEX appears to generally support the energy transition. In its 2021 Integrated Report, published in March 2022, the company supported transitioning the energy mix and clean electricity. In a February 2022 press release, the company [939357 stated support for the decarbonization of the buildings sector. In February 2022 the Financial Times reported that CEMEX supported regulatory frameworks to support replacing fossil fuels with alternative fuels, namely waste from municipal and industrial sources, in the cement production process. The CEO signed an open letter to EU Commission President in May 2022 advocating for a more ambitious revision of the Energy Taxation Directive and a stronger RePowerEU initiative. Industry Association Governance: CEMEX disclosed a partial list of its memberships of industry associations in its 2021 Integrated Report, but with no further details of the company's role within each organization's governing bodies nor their climate change policy positions. The company has not published a review of alignment with its industry associations. CEMEX retains memberships to various industry associations which are negatively lobbying on key climate policies, including CEMBUREAU and Confederación Española de Organizaciones Empresariales (CEOE).

InfluenceMap collects and assesses evidence of corporate climate policy engagement on a weekly basis, depending on the availability of information from each specific data source (for more information see our methodology). While this analysis flows through to the company’s scores each week, the summary above is updated periodically. This summary was last updated in Q3 2022.

Additional Note: Cemex is headquartered in Mexico, where InfluenceMap’s LobbyMap platform can currently only make a provisional assessment of corporate climate policy engagement, due to limited capability to access publicly available data on this issue. As it is possible that InfluenceMap is not yet able to fully capture evidence of Cemex's climate policy engagement activities, these scores should be considered provisional at this time.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
10NSNSNS2NS
12NSNSNS2NS
12NSNS02NS
11NSNSNS11
1NA-1NANANANS
11-1-1-11NS
11-1NS-12NS
02NSNSNS2NS
02NSNSNS2NS
011NS011
12NSNS22NS
0NA1NANANANS
00NSNSNSNSNS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
48%
 
48%
 
61%
 
61%
 
54%
 
54%
 
74%
 
74%
 
36%
 
36%
 
56%
 
56%
 
90%
 
90%
 
71%
 
71%
 
41%
 
41%
 
48%
 
48%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.