Bayer

InfluenceMap Score
C-
Performance Band
60%
Organisation Score
51%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Healthcare
Head​quarters:
Leverkusen, Germany
Brands and Associated Companies:
Monsanto, Bayer Pharmaceuticals, Bayer CropScience, The Climate Corporation
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Bayer appears to be actively engaged on climate change with mixed positions. The company has communicated positive top-line positions on climate action but appears to have retained some negative positions on policy streams in Europe, emphasizing concerns around costs and appearing skeptical of unilateral action in Europe. The company appears to have become less outwardly oppositional in recent years, with public engagement on these policy streams broadly reduced.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Bayer seems to be broadly supportive of climate action in its top-line messaging on climate policy. In its 2021 Sustainability Report, the company supported limiting warming to 1.5°C in line with the IPCC, and in a corporate publication in December 2021, Bayer advocated for climate neutrality in Germany to become “the focus economic project of the coming legislative period.” On its corporate website, accessed in January 2022, the company supported climate policy in line with the UN Paris Agreement. However, in its review of industry association alignment in October 2021 Bayer seemed to suggest that regional carbon pricing legislation would be preferable to national mechanisms should a global scheme not exist. The CEO Werner Baumann advocated for climate policy that strengthens industrial competitiveness in the same October 2021 review.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Bayer appears to have limited interaction with specific policy streams in recent years, with particularly little engagement in 2022. In October 2021 a senior executive at Bayer, Thomas Udesen, broadly supported emissions trading to reduce emissions across the supply chain. In its industry association alignment review in October 2021, Bayer supported renewable energy mandates and clean energy standards, and in an overview of its 2021 lobbying activities on climate policy, published in December 2021, the company stated it supported adopting the target of 50% GHG emissions reductions in the US. On social media in April 2021, a senior executive Matthias Berninger supported the EU and UK’s increased 2030 GHG emission reduction targets. In April 2022 Bayer expressed broad support for the EU policy proposal to introduce a certification of carbon removals, however, seemingly advocating for a voluntary carbon market and non-mandatory instruments in the policy.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Bayer appears to support the energy transition but maintains that policies should maintain international competitiveness and minimize costs. In a review of its industry association alignment in October 2021, the company supported decarbonization policies in line with the UN Paris Agreement and the transition away from fossil fuels. In September 2021, Bayer signed a joint letter advocating for policymakers to commit to end new coal power development and financing at COP26, combined with phase out plans by 2030 in advanced economies and 2040 in other countries. The letter also supported the phase out of fossil fuel subsidies by 2025. In its 2021 CDP climate change disclosure, the company supported the energy transition but suggested that measures must preserve competitiveness and stressed the risks of rising energy prices and energy security.

Industry Association Governance: Bayer has published a review of its alignment on climate policy with industry associations. The review detailed their positions on climate policy and disclosed a clear framework for assessing alignment, yet did not describe positions held by company representatives nor the engagement activities of the associations. The review omitted several associations, including the American Chemistry Council which is negatively engaging on climate policy in the US. Bayer retains membership to several industry associations which are lobbying negatively on climate change such as the National Association of Manufacturers and BusinessEurope, and has influential positions on the board of associations such as the German Chemical Industry Association (VCI) and the Federation of German Industry (BDI) which are negatively engaging on EU climate policy.

A detailed assessment of the company's corporate review on climate policy engagement can be found on InfluenceMap's CA100+ Investor Hub here.

InfluenceMap collects and assesses evidence of corporate climate policy engagement on a weekly basis, depending on the availability of information from each specific data source (for more information see our methodology). While this analysis flows through to the company’s scores each week, the summary above is updated periodically. This summary was last updated in Q3 2022.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
12NANSNS1NS
11NS211NS
11NS-1NS1NS
121NSNS2NS
0NA-1NANANANS
NS-1NSNS1-2NS
NSNS1NS11NS
00NS-1-10NS
1NS1NSNS-1NS
110-102NS
110NS20NS
0NS1NANANANS
01NS0NS1NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
45%
 
45%
 
57%
 
57%
 
45%
 
45%
 
42%
 
42%
 
71%
 
71%
 
29%
 
29%
 
55%
 
55%
 
55%
 
55%
 
62%
 
62%
 
71%
 
71%
 
67%
 
67%
 
47%
 
47%
 
12%
 
12%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.