Unipol

InfluenceMap Score
B-
Performance Band
73%
Organisation Score
46%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Financials
Head​quarters:
Bologna, Italy
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Unipol appears to be fairly active in advocating for regulation on sustainable finance, although its disclosure on engagement with policy appears to have decreased during 2020-2021. Unipol has advocated for reform to address short-termism in markets, and has stated support for a role for finance in meeting the goals of the Paris Agreement. Unipol was also strongly supportive of the EU's Action Plan on Sustainable Finance in its 2018 company magazine.

Unipol supported the EU's update to the non-binding guidelines for reporting climate-related information with minor exceptions around the need for flexibility in feedback to the European Commission's Technical Expert Group (TEG) in 2019.

Unipol stated support for the creation of the taxonomy in feedback to the European Commission's High-Level Expert Group on Sustainable Finance (HLEG) in 2017 and since then has stated support for the EU's taxonomy in its company magazine. Similarly, Unipol supported the creation of stringent green standards and labels in feedback to the HLEG in 2017 and, in 2018, stated support for the EU's Ecolabel and Green Bond Standard in its company magazine.

In feedback to the European Commission in 2018, Unipol supported the investors' disclosure regulation and updates to MiFID II to integrate ESG preferences in the advice investment firms give to clients. However, in both cases Unipol stated concerns over the planned implementation timelines.

Unipol has disclosed advocacy activities on certain sustainable finance policies, but has not clearly described outcomes they are seeking. More recently, Unipol's 2020 Sustainability Report described some of the sustainable finance policies they are engaging on but without expressing clear positions. Unipol has disclosed some of its sustainability-related association memberships, but it does not appear to be disclosing key industry association memberships or any further details of its governance of indirect influence.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
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Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
49%
 
49%
 
48%
 
48%
 
42%
 
42%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.