Suncorp

InfluenceMap Score
C
Performance Band
67%
Organisation Score
52%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Financials
Head​quarters:
Brisbane, Australia
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Suncorp appears to have very limited engagement with specific climate policy, although the company’s top-line messaging on climate change and the energy transition is generally positive. However, it is worth noting that the company has membership in industry associations that have negatively lobbied against climate policy.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: The Group published a Climate Change Action Plan in September 2021 where they acknowledged the science of climate change, stated support for the Paris Agreement and the goal of keeping global warming below 1.5° Celsius from above pre-industrial levels. Suncorp also backed the need to transition to a net-zero emissions' economy by 2050 in its Climate-Related Financial Disclosures document, published in June 2020. In February 2020, Suncorp CEO called for a national response to climate change in Australia, including increased investment in mitigation efforts.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: InfluenceMap has found limited evidence of Suncorp’s engagement with specific climate-related legislation. In November 2019, the company stated its support for Australia’s and New Zealand’s federal commitments to reduce GHG emissions by 2030.

Positioning on Energy Transition: In August 2020, Suncorp Chair Christine McLoughlin expressed basic top-line support for an “orderly transition” to a low-carbon economy. Evidence suggests that the company also supported a global shift to both renewables and “clean energy and zero carbon grids” in 2020.

Industry Association Governance: Suncorp has disclosed its membership to several industry associations including Carbon Market Institute and the Business Council of Australia, the latter of which has historically engaged negatively on climate policy in Australia. However, the company has not made a clear and accessible disclosure of its industry association memberships, and also excluded its membership to the Australian Chamber of Commerce & Industry which has consistently lobbied against ambitious climate action in Australia.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
2NSNA1NS1NS
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1NSNSNSNS1NS
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-1NA-1NANANANA
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
52%
 
52%
 
75%
 
75%
 
36%
 
36%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.