CRH

InfluenceMap Score
D+
Performance Band
57%
Organisation Score
47%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Construction Materials
Head​quarters:
Dublin, Ireland
Brands and Associated Companies:
Tarmac, CRH Americas Materials, Opterra, Ash Grove Cement
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: CRH appears to take a mixed approach to climate change policy, albeit with limited engagement on specific climate regulations, the company’s positions evolving to become more positive since 2018 in its top-line messaging. The organization supports the energy transition and the need to reduce GHG emissions, but takes more negative positions on several key climate policies.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: CRH appears to take a broadly positive position on climate policy in its top-line messaging. The company supported pursuing efforts to limit warming to 1.5°C in a 2022 Climate Advocacy Review, published in March 2022. In its 2021 Annual Report, CRH recognized the need for a “supportive climate policy environment” and supported public policy to deliver a net-zero built environment. In its 2022 Climate Advocacy Review, the company supported carbon pricing with the caveat that it must protect against carbon leakage and protect competitiveness. On its corporate website in November 2020, CRH supported the UN Paris Agreement.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: CRH appears to have limited but negative engagement with specific climate regulations. In its 2022 Climate Advocacy Review, the company supported emissions trading systems which protect against carbon leakage, meaning that they should include compensatory measures such as the free allocation of emissions allowances or compensate costs, which could weaken the price signal of a cap-and-trade policy. However, in the same review, CRH broadly supported carbon border adjustment mechanisms to create a level playing field between importers and domestic producers. In its 20-F disclosure in 2020, CRH did not seem to support increasing the EU’s 2030 GHG target to 55%, stating that it would “represent a significant extra constraint on cement operations in Europe.” However, its subsidiary Tarmac stated support for product and buildings standards to encourage the uptake of low-carbon concrete in a blog in November 2021.

Positioning on Energy Transition: CRH seems to broadly support the energy transition. In its 2021 Annual Report, published in March 2022, the company supported policy measures to support low-carbon cement production. It also advocated for policies to support breakthrough technologies to decarbonize the cement industry including biomass and alternative fuels in its 2022 Climate Advocacy Review. Its subsidiary, Tarmac, voiced support for an electric charging and hydrogen refueling network for transport, but did not state a position on the decarbonization of hydrogen, in a blog published in November 2021.

Industry Association Governance: CRH disclosed a list of some industry associations in its 2020 Sustainability Report (published in March 2021), with some disclosure of the company’s role and the climate policy positions of the associations. The company has not carried out a review of alignment of its membership of industry associations. Senior executives hold influential positions in key industry associations, such as the National Association of Manufacturers and CEMBUREAU, which are lobbying climate policy with negative engagement in the US and Europe respectively.

A detailed assessment of the company's corporate review on climate policy engagement can be found on InfluenceMap's CA100+ Investor Hub here.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
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Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
53%
 
53%
 
48%
 
48%
 
28%
 
28%
 
56%
 
56%
 
28%
 
28%
 
36%
 
36%
 
52%
 
52%
 
64%
 
64%
 
74%
 
74%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.