Aviva

InfluenceMap Score
B
Performance Band
90%
Organisation Score
52%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Financials
Head​quarters:
London, United Kingdom
Brands and Associated Companies:
Aviva Investors
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Aviva appears to be a leader in advocating for regulation on sustainable finance, with subsidiary Aviva Investors contributing a significant proportion of its policy engagement. Aviva has been almost alone in the financial sector in calling for systemic reform to achieve a sustainable financial system and has stated support for limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees and net-zero by 2050. Aviva’s CEO, Amanda Blanc, has also advocated for an increase in climate ambition to achieve net-zero by 2050 co-signing a letter to UK’s Prime Minister in 2021. Since at least 2015, Aviva has consistently advocated for policymakers to increase the ambition of sustainable finance policy. For example, in 2022, in a joint paper with WWF, Aviva stated support for introducing alignment with net-zero by 2050 as a statutory secondary objective for UK financial regulators.

Aviva has advocated for the integration of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) guidelines into EU policy and in 2021, Steve Waygood, Chief Responsible Investment Officer at Aviva Investors, supported mandatory implementation of the TCFD by the G7. In its 2020 Responsible Investment Report, Aviva also advocated for governments to require companies to disclose their action plans in aligning their business strategies and climate goals. Also in 2020, Aviva supported the UK’s DWP proposed regulation on aligning disclosures with the TCFD for pension schemes as well as FCA’s proposed mandatory TCFD for listed issuers.

In 2018, Aviva stated support for the taxonomy regulation, which defines which economic activities are consistent with the EU's climate goals, in feedback to a European Commission consultation. Aviva has further stated support the extension of the taxonomy to environmentally harmful activities, in an IPE article in 2019 and in feedback to the Commission on the Renewed Strategy on Sustainable Finance in 2020. In a joint 2022 paper with WWF, Aviva stated support for integrating nature-related considerations into the UK taxonomy.

Aviva has been supportive of the creation of an EU Green Bond Standard, advocating for a stringent approach to verification and suggesting that policymakers should "expedite plans" in a 2019 Aviva Investors blog. It also supported the EU Green Bond Standard, ESG benchmark and advocated for an increase in ambition on ESG standards in feedback to the Commission in 2020.

Aviva has been vocal in its support for clarifying that fiduciary duty should cover ESG issues. It supported more ambitious action around fiduciary duty in its feedback to the Commission's Renewed Sustainable Finance Strategy in 2020.

In 2020 and 2021 blogs on its website, Aviva Investors has also advocated for updates in prudential regulation to consider sustainability factors and the extension of stress testing to include climate risk. In its 2022 Climate transition plan, Aviva advocated for central banks to be provided with net-zero mandates, and for global coordination on stress testing.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
21NSNS12NS
12NS211NS
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2NSNS22NSNS
22NS12NSNS
2NS122NSNS
2NS1NS1NSNS
1NANANANANANA
0NANANANANANA
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
56%
 
56%
 
47%
 
47%
 
42%
 
42%
 
41%
 
41%
 
55%
 
55%
 
52%
 
52%
 
49%
 
49%
 
48%
 
48%
 
81%
 
81%
 
71%
 
71%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.