Amazon

InfluenceMap Score
B-
Performance Band
78%
Organisation Score
62%
Relationship Score
Sector:
Retailing
Head​quarters:
Seattle, United States
Brands and Associated Companies:
www.amazon.com, amazon.com
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: Amazon is engaging positively with climate-related policy. The company demonstrates a clear interest in renewable energy and the energy transition, though it appears less engaged with many more specific forms of climate policy.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Amazon has positive top-line messaging on climate policy. The company has a clear and accessible position on climate change science and appears to support urgent climate action in line with IPCC recommendations. In October 2021, Amazon tweeted in support of climate policy in the US Build Back Better Act, noting that its position includes support for tax increases “to pay for things like infrastructure.” Its 2020 Sustainability Report, released June 2021, highlights its support for certain forms of climate policy. In addition, through multiple sign-on letters, Amazon has demonstrated support for the Paris Agreement, including advocating for the US to rejoin the agreement in December 2020 and supporting President Biden's decision to rejoin in April 2021.

Engagement with Climate-Related Policy: Amazon is engaging positively and increasingly actively with climate-related policies. In January 2022, Amazon and other technology companies filed a joint amicus brief in support of the EPA's right to regulate greenhouse gas emissions, following West Virginia's case against the EPA. In March 2021, Amazon wrote a letter to the Washington state legislature strongly supporting a Low-Carbon Fuel Standard in the state. In an April 2021 joint letter with the We Mean Business Coalition, Amazon advocated for an ambitious emissions reduction target under the U.S. Nationally Determined Contribution to the Paris Agreement. Through Ceres, Amazon has also supported the strengthening of federal fuel economy and GHG standards for light-duty vehicles. In 2019-20, Amazon has spoken out in support of US legislation related to master limited partnerships, and in the EU, engaged with legislators on the need to remove barriers to renewable energy purchasing and renewable energy trading. Previously, in 2018 and 2019, Amazon wrote the public utilities commissions in Georgia and Virginia to advocate for increased renewable energy generation.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Evidence suggests Amazon supports the transition to a low-carbon economy. Stating that current regulations in Japan pose a challenge for the company to meet its renewable energy targets, in August 2021 Amazon Japan announced plans for direct power purchases. The company appears increasingly engaged with clean transportation measures: in its Q4 2021 federal lobbying disclosure, Amazon reported engagement on several policy areas related to clean transportation, including electrification and alternative fuels. In 2019, it encouraged state governments to adopt transport electrification measures, and in 2020, committed to lobby for clean transportation policies through Ceres’ Corporate Electric Vehicle Alliance. In Europe, Amazon called on policymakers through the RE-source coalition in 2018 to advocate for decarbonization of electricity.

Industry Association Governance: Amazon is a member of Advanced Energy Economy, which has lobbied positively on most forms of climate policy in the US, although the company retains its membership to the US Chamber of Commerce and the Japanese Business Federation, both of which have consistently opposed ambitious climate action in their respective jurisdictions. Conversely, in Japan, Amazon is an executive member at the Japan Climate Leaders Partnership (JCLP), which has actively called on the Japanese government to accelerate zero emissions vehicles and introduce carbon taxes, emissions trading, and ambitious renewable energy policies. Amazon is also a member of the Business Roundtable, which engages on U.S. climate policy with mixed positions.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
20NSNS-12NS
11NS120NS
22NSNS00NS
12NSNS10NS
1NA-2NANANANS
NSNSNSNSNSNSNS
NSNSNSNSNSNSNS
12NSNSNSNSNS
11NS21NSNS
12NS21NSNS
NS2NA22NSNS
0NS-2NANANANS
NSNSNSNSNSNSNS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
60%
 
60%
 
51%
 
51%
 
95%
 
95%
 
83%
 
83%
 
88%
 
88%
 
76%
 
76%
 
75%
 
75%
 
29%
 
29%
 
49%
 
49%
 
52%
 
52%
 
40%
 
40%
 
85%
 
85%
 
54%
 
54%
 
35%
 
35%
 
64%
 
64%
 
35%
 
35%
 
41%
 
41%
 
71%
 
71%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.